Glow-In-The-Dark Ramen Makes Food Taste Alien

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Glow-In-The-Dark Ramen Makes Food Taste Alien
January 19, 2019
Tickets for the pop-up have already sold out.
 By Zoo as Zoo (Courtesy of Dashboard)

 

- Ami Sueki, the founder of design studio Zoo as Zoo, has teamed up with Courtney Hammond, the cofounder of national arts agency Dashboard, to create the world's first glow-in-the-dark ramen shop.

Nakamura.ke is a mobile pop-up that will offer guests an immersive dining experience inspired by a story about a family of mythical spirits.

- The shop will seat six diners at a time for one 30-minute meal during which guests will be served glow-in-the-dark dishes and cocktails as performers interact with them.

- The luminescent noodles were created by London food-design firm Bompas and Parr using quinine and natural food coloring.

- After debuting in Atlanta later this month, Nakamura.ke will head to several other cities, including Los Angeles, New York, and Miami, according to Atlanta Magazine.

 

If you've ever wondered what mythical spirits might eat, it probably looks something like the menu at the world's first glow-in-the-dark ramen shop.

 

Nakamura.ke, which opens in Atlanta later this month, offers guests an immersive dining experience inspired by a dream designer Ami Sueki had three years ago.

The food is inspired by a story about a family of supernatural creatures.
By Zoo as Zoo (Courtesy of Dashboard)

 

The mobile pop-up tells the story of the Nakamuras, a family of yōkai (supernatural creatures in Japanese folklore) who ran a popular ramen shop for other spirits at the turn of the century.

 

In the tale, which was created by Sueki's design studio, Zoo as Zoo, the Nakamura children lost their parents in a storm one fateful night. Years later, they reunited at their family's old shop, only to discover glowing noodles and vibrating utensils, as if someone was trying to show them how to make their parents' secret ramen recipe.

 

Now the Nakamura children chase after full moons around the world — when noodles glow the brightest — making ramen in their mobile kitchen, hoping they'll one day reunite with their parents.

The noodles are made with quinine and food coloring.
By Zoo as Zoo (Courtesy of Dashboard)

 

To bring this story to life, Sueki teamed up with Courtney Hammond, the cofounder of national arts agency Dashboard.

 

Like the Nakamura children's mobile kitchen, Nakamura.ke will be a small, intimate space, seating six diners at a time for one 30-minute meal. During that period, guests will be served glow-in-the-dark dishes and cocktails as performers interact with them.

 

Sueki also collaborated with London food-design firm Bompas and Parr to create her pop-up's luminescent food. According to Atlanta Magazine, the studio's inventors used quinine, a compound extracted from the bark of cinchona trees that glows under black light, and natural food coloring to make noodles that were both luminescent and safe to eat.

Nakamura.ke will also serve glowing sake cocktails.
By Zoo as Zoo (Courtesy of Dashboard)

 

Dining tickets for Nakamura.ke's first two openings, in late January and February, have already sold out and went for $75 a seat.

 

For those curious to see the shop's luminescent offerings, however, tickets to a party at Space2 in Atlanta will be sold at the door for $10. The party will be held on Wednesdays through Saturdays from 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. for the duration of Nakamura.ke's run at The Sound Table, from January 30 until February 16.

 

Dashboard and Zoo as Zoo also plan to take Nakamura.ke to Los Angeles, London, Miami, New York, Tokyo, Seoul, Sydney, and Dubai.

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